The Bleak Reel Review

Hey, have you watched The Texas Chainsaw Massacre or Cannibal Holocaust? How about Audition or Martyrs? Oh, oh, you’ve watched 2 Girls 1 Cup and Mr. Hands. Right? I got another one for you. Have you watched The Bleak? Nope, forget I said anything. I didn’t mean to bring it up. Then again, maybe you’re curious. Maybe now you can’t get The Bleak out of your head. This guy is telling me that I can’t handle The Bleak? I’ll show him. I’ll watch it. Just remember, what’s been seen cannot be unseen.

The Bleak is an extreme horror experience directed by James Bell. Set up as an anthology the viewer goes on a journey through multiple horrific and violent set pieces. From otherworldly monsters to serial murderers nothing is off-limits when it comes to The Bleak. The special effects, done by James Bell and Mae Bell, are noteworthy because they are truly incredible. Anyone interested in practical gore is going to love the miles of intestines splayed and gallons of blood sprayed in every frame of The Bleak. Another positive would be the soundtrack composed by Kids Kill Kids. The beeps, blips, and constant droning of electronic noise really heightens the shocking scenes that are playing before the viewers eyes. 

Beyond shock value and whispered about curiosity The Bleak doesn’t have much more to offer. The story is basically nonexistent as none of the vignettes are related as far as plot. The way they connect is creative, however, as characters often show up in each other’s scenarios. Character development is lacking as most of the individuals spend their time killing or running away from being killed. The dealbreaker when it comes to reviewing The Bleak is the content. I cannot express this enough, if you do not wish to view extreme scenes of violence, rape, torture, and murder do not watch The Bleak under any circumstance.

That being said curiosity is a weird thing. The Bleak is a challenge to find and a challenge to watch. Everybody enjoys a challenge, right? Just like a child reaching out to touch the top of the stove burner for the first time, you might find yourself in a similar situation. Sitting in front of your television with a DVD copy of The Bleak in your PS2, finger hovering over the play button. Ready to be burned.

I give The Bleak 2 out of 6 reels.

Happy Mother’s Day Reel Review

(Message to readers: Happy Mothers Day is a sequel to Cindy’s Birthday Party. Cindy’s Birthday Party has been previously reviewed and can be found at Cinemaslice.com.)

It’s been many years since Jonas(Martin James) vanished without a trace after attending Cindy’s(Gracie Demski) birthday. Cindy is now a teenager and has invited her friend, Samantha(Maryann Fisher), over for a party. It’s Mother’s Day and it seems like a nice gesture since Samantha has no one to celebrate with. Soon enough Mr. Gremshaw(Dan Busch), the caretaker, shows up and leads Cindy and Samantha to the basement where Cindy’s mother(Donna Madison) is ready to celebrate.

Happy Mother’s Day is a horror short written and directed by August Aguilar. The film is a sequel to Cindy’s Birthday Party, which was also directed by August. Happy Mother’s Day is a horror fest, filled with crazy characters, that has improved in many ways over its predecessor. One criticism I had with Cindy’s Birthday Party was the many unaddressed questions. Many answers are given in Happy Mother’s Day, while also maintaining enough of the mystery that good horror thrives upon. Another fantastic addition was the practical gore effects done by Ryan Smith. They boosted the short’s entertainment value to another level. Also, I have to mention Gracie Demski’s portrayal of Cindy. That blank stare and subtle eye twitch really creeped me out.

One criticism that I have with Happy Mother’s Day is that the plot is familiar. Nostalgia and reverence to earlier film is important, but ultimately too much can lead to predictability. The question mark of Cindy’s family remains, however, and because of the revelations in Happy Mother’s Day I’m excited for more. If another sequel is in the works I hope to see some interesting plot choices added to the other excellent improvements.

Overall, Happy Mother’s Day was a bloody good time. The characters were unique and interesting and the makeup effects exceptional. The story was formulaic but didn’t disrupt the film’s quality. I recommend this film to fans of 1970’s horror, particularly films with sadistic family units.

I give Happy Mothers Day 5 out of 6 reels.

Quarantine Reel Review

Another exciting episode of The Night Shift is ready to begin filming. Tonight reporter Angela Vidal(Jennifer Carpenter) and cameraman Scott Percival(Steve Harris) are shadowing the firemen of the LAFD. Things remain relatively calm until a call comes in from a nearby apartment building. George Fletcher(Johnathon Schaech) and Jake(Jay Hernandez) respond to the incident, with Angela and Scott in tow. A resident of the building, a Ms. Espinoza(Jeannie Epper), is acting very erratically. She’s extremely aggressive toward others and there’s a mysterious thick foam emerging from her mouth . . .

Quarantine is a 2008 found footage horror film directed by John Erick Dowdle. Based on the 2007 Spanish film called REC, Quarantine is excellent at capturing the grimy look and claustrophobic feel of the original. The setting of the century old apartment building lends an authenticity to the creepiness. Old places tend to have an air of mystery which creates apprehension and unease. The makeup and effects work are also exceptional. By the end of the film you’ll be on edge and the creature design has a lot to do with that anxiety. Ms. Espinoza was on my mind for days after my first viewing.

Quarantine isn’t without faults. The main criticism is a classic among the horror genre. Everyone in Quarantine is doing something stupid at every turn. Given our current situation in the real world, this statement may seem to ring true. I, however, am not talking about “that’s not what I would do” stupid. I’m talking about “that’s not what ANYONE would do” stupid. Like backing against a door made mostly of glass when you know a monster is on the other side of that door. Which happens in this movie. Literally.

Despite an over abundance of bad decisions being made by multiple characters, Quarantine isn’t without its merits. The setting and creature designs are high quality and do most of the work when it comes to scares. Quarantine is a visually frightening found footage freak show and I recommend it to anyone who is willing to turn off their brain for a scary good time.

I give Quarantine 3 out of 6 reels.

28 Days Later Reel Review

28 days ago an animal rights activist group broke into a research testing facility. Their intentions were good, wanting to free a large group of caged monkeys. During the release, however, they soon learn that the primates carry a dark secret. 28 days later, Jim(Cillian Murphy) wakes up in an abandoned hospital. The building and surrounding city are in ruins and seemingly every human has vanished. Upon entering a church, Jim slowly begins to realize what has happened when he encounters a horrifying scene. After being saved by survivors Mark(Noah Huntley) and Selena(Naomie Harris) all three must work together to escape the terrors they will encounter.

28 Days Later is a 2002 apocalyptic horror film directed by Danny Boyle and written by Alex Garland. Redefining the genre as we know it the movie popularized one of the most horrifying movie monsters, the fast “zombie”. I put zombie in quotes because in 28 Days Later you don’t see the traditional undead zombie. Instead we get another version, one that is just as chaotic, unpredictable, and constantly hungry for anything that moves. The film revolves around these infected humans and are what provides the brilliant tension, eerie scenery and relatable characters we see throughout the rest of the film.

It’s tough to find a critique during the entire runtime of 28 Days Later. The set design is impeccable. The serenity and loneliness of an abandoned London is perfectly captured. This, along with the haunting soundtrack, is what builds the suspense that is soon broken by the shrieks of the infected. Essentially, it’s a movie full of beautifully crafted and well thought out jump scares. The nuanced relationships between the characters we meet trying to escape the city are emotional. By the end of the film you’re rooting for them to conquer every obstacle they meet.

I cannot praise 28 Days Later enough. A true modern classic in horror cinema, it nails everything it sets to carry out. Do the main characters make some decisions that are questionable? Sure, but considering they are human you see them learn and grow from these choices in a world were decision-making is a deadly game. I solidly recommend 28 Days Later to anyone who enjoys horror or great movies in general.

I give 28 Days Later 6 out of 6 reels.

The Unwelcoming House 2 -Reel Review

Joe(Joe Covarrubias), his wife, son Landen(Landen Covarrubias), and family dog Bailey finally escaped the house that terrorized them for weeks. They believed that they had left behind the sadistic Larry Adams and his ever-present walking cane. Unfortunately, Joe slowly began to realize that this wasn’t the case. He saw Larry Adams everywhere he went, continually being haunted by his presence. When Bailey dies under mysterious circumstances Joe decides that he must go back. Deep down, he wants to go back. Joe has to learn more about Larry Adams and the demonic presence that seems to surround him. Once again Joe must enter the Unwelcoming House.

Joe Covarrubias, director of The Unwelcoming House, is back in this superbly creepy sequel, The Unwelcoming House 2. Done in the same found footage/documentary style as the first installment The Unwelcoming House 2 ups the ante in a few key areas. First off, the pacing of this film is better. Joe goes back to his earlier home for a week and the nights are clearly delineated for the viewer. This layout makes the move forward fun for the audience as the tension and scares build throughout the movie at a brisk pace. Secondly, the mystery surrounding the house and Larry Adams is better explained giving the viewer context as to what’s going on. The pacing and detailed back story lead to scares that would impress any fan of the found footage horror genre.

A couple of criticisms I have with The Unwelcoming House 2 are ones similar to that of the previous installment. Once again, the story has plot holes that could have been better explained. One is the fact that an entire house filled with valuable items is abandoned. This is barely addressed and no matter how scared Joe was it’s hard to believe he would never try to retrieve some of these items. Another unfortunate problem is with the ending. A tactic that Joe has previously used throughout the films now seems to get him results, without explanation. Because of this the final confrontation feels anticlimactic to a certain degree.

Overall, The Unwelcoming House 2 is a successful sequel in The Unwelcoming House saga. It’s better paced, delivering well crafted scares that range from unnerving to horrifying. Some plot holes still remain but are fewer than there were in the original. For these reasons I recommend The Unwelcoming House 2 for fans of the original film wondering what ever became of Joe and his son Landen.

I give The Unwelcoming House 2 5 out of 6 reels.

The Unwelcoming House – Reel Review

Joe (Joe Covarrubias) is a typical, run of the mill family man. He lives in Mount Pleasant, MI with his wife, son Landon (Landon Covarrubias), and Bailey the family dog. There’s only one problem plaguing this idyllic family. Something or someone has started to haunt their home. What started as harmless noises, such as footsteps and eerie creaking, has escalating into something much more sinister. Joe now has to protect his family by diving into the houses history. A history that has the potential to violently harm not only Joe but also the ones that he loves the most.

Directed by Joe Covarrubias, The Unwelcoming House is an intensely creepy and unnerving found footage horror film. Some notable aspects of this movie are the methods of filming and the superbly scary scenes that arise from this style. Found footage is the coined term for this type of movie, but it would be better described as a fictional documentary. Joe is shooting footage to document his ghostly findings and nobody is really “finding” his work. Due to this you get a more steady and deft hand guiding the camera. This gets rid of the distracting and sometimes annoying “shaky cam” style. Another appreciated aspect of this film is the way the delivery of the script. A natural way of speaking lends to more believable dialogue in found footage films and Joe really nails this performance. 

One criticism of The Unwelcoming House is the strict adherence to the found footage horror formula. The film stays true to this blueprint and, in doing so, makes things a bit stale in terms of plot. Characters get explained away in convenient ways, a MacGuffin explains the demons ties to the home, and a few other elements echo popular found footage horror movies. None of these are deal breakers, however, as the film overall is impressive and technically well made.

The Unwelcoming House is a horrific and terrifying look into one chapter of a family’s struggle with a demonic entity. The story is an homage to found footage horror films of the past almost to a fault, but is technically proficient and the dialogue is expertly delivered. The Unwelcoming House is definitely a welcomed edition into the pantheon of found footage horror. 

I give The Unwelcoming House 4 out of 6 reels.

Cindy’s Birthday Party Reel Review

Cindy’s(Maddie Giorgio) big day has finally arrived. She is excited about her birthday and her mother(Merri Field Giorgio) has a special event planned. It’s a birthday party and the guests are starting to arrive. Jonas(Dylan Busch), one of the guests, gets out of the chauffeured limo and Cindy greets him at her front door. Jonas soon notices that no other guests are at the party. His suspicions further arise when Cindy tells him to go down to where the party is being held. Down into the basement.

Cindy’s Birthday Party, directed by August Aguilar, is a technically proficient and incredibly well acted horror short. The direction and writing are noteworthy due to the use of child actors in the film. It’s clear that Maddie Giorgio and Dylan Busch knew exactly what they were performing and that they had a full understanding of the story being told. The planning, along with some improvisation mixed in, seemed to work well as the children moved and talked very naturally in the environment. This fine acting along with an excellent buildup of tension and suspense in the plot are clear strong points in Cindy’s Birthday Party.

Some criticisms of Cindy’s Birthday Party are a lack of originality in the premise of the film and some unanswered questions which left a few holes in the plot. The celebratory atmosphere of the birthday party counteracted nicely with the ever-present creepiness of the story. Unfortunately, it also felt like a fancy dress being put on a basic “lambs being led to the slaughter” scenario. Perhaps if some questions were partly answered, like where are the birthday guest’s parents and who is the chauffeur bringing them, this may have livened things up. The mystery behind the thing in the basement, however, was fantastic and correctly was left to the imagination.

Cindy’s Birthday Party is a suspenseful and wonderfully acted horror short. It maintains the creepiness throughout and rarely relies on cheap jump scares. The plot is a tad basic which a few answered questions could have fixed, but the overall product is only slightly effected. A big recommendation to anyone who enjoys horror that slowly chills you to the bone.

I give Cindy’s Birthday Party 4 out of 6 reels.

A Suds and Cinema Christmas Part 2 of 2

Shelf Elf

Dad(Smithey Smithiggins) just brought home something special for his daughter(Whitney McRiverbottom). It’s a doll named Twinkle Daddy(Elmer McRiverbottom), designed to help the family get ready for Christmas. In reality, it’s a game intended to get children excited for Santa’s arrival. When mom(Darla Duodenum) notices that Twinkle Daddy seems to be moving on his own, however, the parents begin to wonder if it actually is “just a game”. 

A surreal mix of comedy and horror set during the Christmas holiday, Shelf Elf is bizarre in all the best ways. The film is a unique and creative take on the popular Elf on the Shelf game. Director Brett Smith maintains a grounded feel to the film that counteracts nicely with the more fantastic elements. The actors also do a great job staying in character, considering the wacky premise. Kudos goes to the dad in the film for having to carry Twinkle Daddy around, which looked like an impressive feat.

I give Shelf Elf 6 out of 6 reels. 

Crushed Kringle

Kris Kringle(Matthew Sams) has fallen on hard times. After changing his name to Chris Bowdoen he now spends his time drinking beers and eating snacks. Even his buddies T-Spoon(Jazzy Jackson) and Re-Mote(Shane Egan) can’t seem to drag him out of his slump. It may take a Christmas miracle to get Kris back to his old gift delivering, bad ass basketball playing self.

Director Matthew Sams delivers a dark comedic gem in his holiday short Crushed Kringle. We have seen multiple versions of Santa Claus in movies over the years, but Matthew’s take is still unique. By being creative it allows the absurdist elements in the story to shine, making them all the more hilarious. The character work is excellent and pairs well with each actor’s great performance. The plot moves quickly, however, and may lose some viewers’ attention do to the crazy story. Despite this Crushed Kringle is still a hilarious look at the sometimes depressing Christmas season.

I give Crushed Kringle 5 out of 6 reels.

House Music

A family has decorated their house for the Christmas holiday. They also took the time to synchronize the lights in time with a classic holiday tune. Enjoy experiencing the sonic and visual spectacle they have created.

Delightful, clean, and well choreographed are some descriptors that come to mind when viewing House Music by animator Joe Doll. By blending two Christmas traditions, holiday music and house decoration, Joe has created something special. The build up in intensity is a nice touch, as it keeps the viewer interested until the end. While there is no story to speak of House Music is still entertaining, nonetheless.

I give House Music 4 out of 6 reels.

Krampusnacht

Sophia(Kelly Aston) and Adam(Nathan Oesterle) have a problem. Their son Hans(Samuel Gagliardi) has been an absolute terror and it’s only getting worse. That’s when Adam decides to tell Hans the tale of Krampusnacht. The night when Krampus(Brandon Despain) comes to get all the bad little boys and girls.

We have seen the legend of Krampus told in many films over the years. In Krampusnacht, directed by Pete Talamo, we get another version of this horror classic. The set design and cinematography in Krampusnacht are exceptional and gives the film a traditional Christmas flavor. The creature design is beastly and horrifying. The story falters, however, when it comes to the boy Hans. Samuel Gagliardi gives an amazing performance as Hans, but is given some over the top dialogue. The boy is amazingly rude and disobedient, which may distract some viewers while watching. Despite this Krampusnacht is still very scary and is another great entry in the Krampus lore.

I give Krampusnacht 4 out of 6 reels.

Naughty List

Last year Santa Claus(Kurt Salgat) didn’t give a certain little boy(Tobin Welborn) the bike he wanted. This year that boy has something in store for Santa.

In Naughty List, directed by Nathan Smith, Cindy Gaul, and Micheal Welborn, we get an interesting take on the naughty/nice list that Santa Claus uses when delivering presents. What would happen if a child didn’t agree with Santa’s assessment? Naughty List, although quite short, accomplishes what it sets out to do, which is unsettle the viewer. Naughty List is recommended to any horror fan that would enjoy seeing Santa having the tables turned on himself.

I give Naughty List 3 out of 6 reels.

Alchemy

A man(Ian Kevin Scott) enters a mysterious interview and starts an impossibly long questionnaire. A woman(Angela Pietropinto) tells him he must answer, accurately and thoroughly, the complete form before leaving. When the man is later locked in his testing room will he escape or forever be trapped in this place of perpetual limbo?

Alchemy, directed by Brandon Polanco, is a film that asks many questions while answering very few. That is left up to the viewer and, in many ways, is the point of the film. Alchemy is technically very well done. The acting, direction, cinematography and sound design are on point and help the viewer in forming their own meaning of the film. In the same way the man struggled to find a way out of the room, the viewer must struggle with finding their own explanations of the material presented. Alchemy can be a difficult watch, but you’ll find it stays with you long after. This is what makes it an important watch.

I give Alchemy 6 out of 6 reels.

Santa Comes Tonight

Santa Claus has arrived at one of the many stops during his Christmas Eve deliveries. It seems he has run into a pretty serious problem. He can’t get down the chimney!

Who doesn’t like a Christmas cartoon during the holidays? In Santa Comes Tonight you get exactly that. Animator Joe Doll does a fantastic job in taking Jolly Ole’ Saint Nick and giving him a distinctive personality during the short. This is impressive considering Santa has no dialogue, every movement being very crucial to the plot. Although it would have been nice to see more of Santa’s exploits Santa Comes Tonight will still delight fans of holiday Christmas animation.

I give Santa Comes Tonight 3 out of 6 reels.

A Suds & Cinema Christmas Pt 1 of 2

Naughty 

Christmas is about to arrive and Brie(Gigi Henderson) is worried. She believes she has been naughty. Her concerns are soothed, however, by Santa Claus(Jamie Landau) himself as he is delivering her presents. When she discovers that Santa isn’t who he says he is Brie decides to take matters into her own hands.

Horror has a history of being paired with Christmas stories and in Naughty, directed by Shawn Driscoll, this pairing is pulled off to great effect. A cleverly written story, which keeps you questioning what’s coming next, combined with a creepy performance by Gigi Henderson makes for a horrifying Christmas film. Humor is also added to lighten the mood just enough to make the horror elements more digestible as some may not appreciate the gore.

I give Naughty 5 out of 6 reels.

This Present Situation: A Dark Christmas Comedy

After a freak accident during his Christmas Eve deliveries, Santa Claus(Kyle Vesey) has gone missing. He was last seen at the house of Little Jenny Lou(Ruby Doubtfire). So gather round the fireplace and listen to the rhyming narrator(Andrew Protopapas) as he tells us the tale of what befell Ol’ Saint Nick.

Directed by Alex Caperton, This Present Situation: A Dark Christmas Comedy is exactly what the title describes. It’s a dark comedy with a twist, as it’s also a musical. Well, a musical in that the narrator is reciting the entire story in rhyme. Like some musical inspired films this rhyming element can be polarizing. Since the comedy leans towards the fantastical, the rhyming element fits in perfectly. Similar to other Christmas classics like The Grinch Who Stole Christmas, This Present Situation is a dark but delightfully funny watch.

I give This Present Situation: A Dark Christmas Comedy 5 out of 6 reels.

Joyeux Noël 

A woman(Haley Webb) struggles with feelings of pain and loss during the happiest day of the year, Christmas. She goes through the motions, contemplating her thoughts. How does one cope when the anniversary of a tragedy lands on a day of widespread celebration?

A dramatic short taking place during the Christmas holiday Joyeux Noël, directed by Haley Webb, takes a serious look at the joyous holiday. Beautifully narrated by Laettitia Guyot, the story of Joyeux Noël is relatable for many who have had tragic events happen during the holidays. Haley Webb’s performance is understated and helps the viewer to see her struggles and emotions. This great performance along with the wonderfully narrated story make for a powerful film.

I give Joyeux Noël 6 out of 6 reels.

The Green Jello Song from Thanksgiving: The Musical

It’s time for the grandest meal of the year. Thanksgiving, a time to give thanks for our blessings and the delicious food we are about to eat. What happens, however, when the meal has ended and the leftovers are ready to be put away?

Short and sweet, The Green Jello Song from Thanksgiving: The Musical is an amusing look into the life of a neglected side dish. Animators Sam & Allison are able to make you interested, laugh, and ultimately care for an untouched plate of food. It would be interesting to get more than a brief visit to this world. Despite the short time, however, The Green Jello Song is still highly enjoyable.

I give The Green Jello Song from Thanksgiving: The Musical 4 out of 6 reels.

Thanksgiving 

Roger Blackstone(Robert Ellis Smith) is extending the olive branch to his estranged son Frank(Nick Gifford). He has invited Frank and his girlfriend Trisha(Lanecia Edmonds) for a Thanksgiving dinner. Things quickly fall apart as secrets revealed lead to some embarrassing and hilarious situations.

A short comedy about the craziness that occurs during family functions Thanksgiving, directed by Mike Messier, is an amusing look into these issues. The situations presented are funny although, at times, they do get over the top. This makes the events all the more quirky, but this style may not be for everyone. With every character being fleshed out and well acted it gives the audience a clear picture of their personality and motivations. Thanksgiving is recommended for anyone who enjoys a well done, dramatic comedy.

I give Thanksgiving 5 out of 6 reels.

A Geechee Christmas 

Paul(Matthew Myers) has started a new life, one away from his ex wife Kandi(Denia Hamilton) and their children. Paul’s new family(Paula Walton, Teron Legare Taylor, and Damya Hamilton) are settling in for Christmas Eve unaware that Paul’s ex wife, Kandi, has a plan. It seems Paul hasn’t been the greatest father and Kandi’s scheme is set to give Paul a truly dysfunctional holiday.

Stressful situations can sometimes dominate the holidays and in A Geechee Christmas, directed by J. Paul The Demigod, we get a darkly comedic take on these problems. Setting up a dramatic scenario that wouldn’t be ideal for the holidays makes for a very interesting plot. It then gets even more engaging when a solution to this issue is made. This is when A Geechee Christmas brings the laughs although some may not see the humor due to the children in Paul’s new family being effected in the fallout. A Geechee Christmas is hilarious watch and would be recommended to fans of similar films like Bad Santa.

I give A Geechee Christmas 4 out of 6 reels.

Cookie’s Rap

Cookie the alien has a crazy Christmas tale for all the good boys and girls. It’s not your traditional holiday yarn as it’s being told from the moon and in the form of a rap video. Enjoy!

More of a music video than a traditional film Cookie’s Rap, directed by Alan Maxson, is a one of a kind experience. It’s a funny, totally absurd take on Santa Claus lore as rapped by Cookie, an alien from the moon. Obviously this description alone will make a lot viewers skeptical. If given the chance, however, Cookie’s Rap can be a highly entertaining watch. The creativity, character work, and storytelling are inventive to watch which makes Cookie’s Rap extremely original.

I give Cookie’s Rap 3 out of 6 reels.

O’Tidings of Joy

Santa Claus(Kurt Salgat) is giving a rare look into his workshop during the holiday season. Mrs. Emerson(Tonia Carrier) is finishing her tour and is wondering if her son is going to get his favorite video game. They decide to go to the back room and have a look. Santa’s elves, Pixie(Emily Roszatycki) and Mixie(Bruce Falcon), tag along seeming very excited. Maybe a little too excited.

O’Tidings of Joy, a horror short directed by Nic White & Micheal Welborn, is a frightening look into Santa Claus’s mysterious workshop. The film, similar to the Christmas classic Elf, embraces the Santa Claus lore by treating it as a factual element in a normal, realistic society. What’s intriguing about O’Tidings of Joy is the horror tinge it brings that most of these films lack. Santa’s home is unexplored and it isn’t that far-fetched to believe that something strange may be happening there. Although the overall quality is a little rough around the edges the creative plot alone is worth the watch.

I give O’Tidings of Joy 4 out of 6 reels.

“Good Works” – Reel Review

A woman(Stella Ryan-Lozon) is concerned her life’s purpose may be in jeopardy. Eerie apparitions are tormenting her on an increasingly consistent basis. Will these ghostly visions impede her progress or will she break through these mental instabilities and continue her good work.

Playing like a greatest hits of horror sub genres Good Works, directed by DJ Remark, is a successful short film on many technical fronts. By combining great direction with a mysterious story written by Jason Orr the viewer gets suspenseful tense moments that will please fans of supernatural horror. Great cinematography by Adam Kurtz entwined with gory practical effects by Elizabeth Defelice will delight fans that crave a more realistic feel to their horror. These elements make Good Works an effective piece of scary cinema.

Some mild criticisms of Good Works are a main character whose personality falls a little flat and a storyline that is a bit confusing. Stella Ryan-Luzon plays her character very calmly to protect a revelation during the end of the film. Adding more emotion to the character, though, wouldn’t have ruined the ending. Also, some might want a second viewing due to a slightly perplexing conclusion. Neither of these critiques, however, affect a viewer’s enjoyment of Good Works.

Overall, Good Works is a short horror masterpiece. The ability to mix different sub genres of horror so effortlessly is impressive. Great direction, writing, cinematography and practical effects all helped to make this possible. The main character is a little dry and the ending can be confusing but these don’t disrupt the overall quality. I recommend Good Works to anybody that loves a truly scary movie.

I give Good Works 6 out of 6 reels.