Meet the Slicer: Pete Floyd

Sup Slicers!?

I’d like to introduce everyone to Mr. Peter Paul Socha III Esq. But you can call him Pete Floyd. Pete is the kind of guy that will lovingly call you a douche nozzle on any given Sunday morning. I recently became re-acquainted with Pete, and he expressed interest in writing film reviews for CinemaSlice.com. Well, now that things have been moving, and he’s written a few review articles under his belt– I wanted to take a minute and allow Pete to introduce him self to the SlicerVerse!

This little story I’m about to share with you is a brief look into why it is I am a lover of the cinema. In no way are my opinions facts, nor do I value my opinion over anyone else’s. But I feel 30+ years of enjoying movies at home, in the theater, and even in arenas, going so far as to travel days to see a film debut in an intimate setting, that I have a slightly honed perspective. My story begins like so…

Once upon a time, I was introduced to the wonder of cinema through my parents as a form of babysitting. Plopping me down in front of the ol’ tube to keep me occupied was the first big mistake. It created a love affair that I’ve been maintaining ever since. The second mistake that my parents made was to take me to the theater every weekend. Even if it was to see the silly actioner of the day, it was still an adventure. But the third mistake was encouraging it.

My parents made sure to find ways to get me to the theater no matter what. Or at least to the local video store. (Do you even remember those?) The first film I can remember watching is “The Longest Day“. Considered one of the “great war epics”, the film centers around the invasion of Normandy during World War II. It’s scope and scale are something sorely lacking in Hollywood today. Although released in 1962, a comparable war film wasn’t made until “Saving Private Ryan“, at least in my opinion. I hated it. As a child, who wants to watch a boring historical war movie? I was into Transformers and G.I. Joes. But as I grew older, I came to appreciate the beauty of the movie.

It’s realism at a time when Hollywood avoided showing that level of honesty about one of the most brutal days of the war opened the door for accurate depictions of history in film. Continue reading “Meet the Slicer: Pete Floyd”