The Unwelcoming House 2 -Reel Review

Joe(Joe Covarrubias), his wife, son Landen(Landen Covarrubias), and family dog Bailey finally escaped the house that terrorized them for weeks. They believed that they had left behind the sadistic Larry Adams and his ever-present walking cane. Unfortunately, Joe slowly began to realize that this wasn’t the case. He saw Larry Adams everywhere he went, continually being haunted by his presence. When Bailey dies under mysterious circumstances Joe decides that he must go back. Deep down, he wants to go back. Joe has to learn more about Larry Adams and the demonic presence that seems to surround him. Once again Joe must enter the Unwelcoming House.

Joe Covarrubias, director of The Unwelcoming House, is back in this superbly creepy sequel, The Unwelcoming House 2. Done in the same found footage/documentary style as the first installment The Unwelcoming House 2 ups the ante in a few key areas. First off, the pacing of this film is better. Joe goes back to his earlier home for a week and the nights are clearly delineated for the viewer. This layout makes the move forward fun for the audience as the tension and scares build throughout the movie at a brisk pace. Secondly, the mystery surrounding the house and Larry Adams is better explained giving the viewer context as to what’s going on. The pacing and detailed back story lead to scares that would impress any fan of the found footage horror genre.

A couple of criticisms I have with The Unwelcoming House 2 are ones similar to that of the previous installment. Once again, the story has plot holes that could have been better explained. One is the fact that an entire house filled with valuable items is abandoned. This is barely addressed and no matter how scared Joe was it’s hard to believe he would never try to retrieve some of these items. Another unfortunate problem is with the ending. A tactic that Joe has previously used throughout the films now seems to get him results, without explanation. Because of this the final confrontation feels anticlimactic to a certain degree.

Overall, The Unwelcoming House 2 is a successful sequel in The Unwelcoming House saga. It’s better paced, delivering well crafted scares that range from unnerving to horrifying. Some plot holes still remain but are fewer than there were in the original. For these reasons I recommend The Unwelcoming House 2 for fans of the original film wondering what ever became of Joe and his son Landen.

I give The Unwelcoming House 2 5 out of 6 reels.

The Unwelcoming House – Reel Review

Joe (Joe Covarrubias) is a typical, run of the mill family man. He lives in Mount Pleasant, MI with his wife, son Landon (Landon Covarrubias), and Bailey the family dog. There’s only one problem plaguing this idyllic family. Something or someone has started to haunt their home. What started as harmless noises, such as footsteps and eerie creaking, has escalating into something much more sinister. Joe now has to protect his family by diving into the houses history. A history that has the potential to violently harm not only Joe but also the ones that he loves the most.

Directed by Joe Covarrubias, The Unwelcoming House is an intensely creepy and unnerving found footage horror film. Some notable aspects of this movie are the methods of filming and the superbly scary scenes that arise from this style. Found footage is the coined term for this type of movie, but it would be better described as a fictional documentary. Joe is shooting footage to document his ghostly findings and nobody is really “finding” his work. Due to this you get a more steady and deft hand guiding the camera. This gets rid of the distracting and sometimes annoying “shaky cam” style. Another appreciated aspect of this film is the way the delivery of the script. A natural way of speaking lends to more believable dialogue in found footage films and Joe really nails this performance. 

One criticism of The Unwelcoming House is the strict adherence to the found footage horror formula. The film stays true to this blueprint and, in doing so, makes things a bit stale in terms of plot. Characters get explained away in convenient ways, a MacGuffin explains the demons ties to the home, and a few other elements echo popular found footage horror movies. None of these are deal breakers, however, as the film overall is impressive and technically well made.

The Unwelcoming House is a horrific and terrifying look into one chapter of a family’s struggle with a demonic entity. The story is an homage to found footage horror films of the past almost to a fault, but is technically proficient and the dialogue is expertly delivered. The Unwelcoming House is definitely a welcomed edition into the pantheon of found footage horror. 

I give The Unwelcoming House 4 out of 6 reels.